Local Beekeeper Refuse To Give Up Hobby for Kid With Allergy | 22 Words

Neighbors have slammed a local beekeeper after he refused to give up his hobby for a child with an allergy.

The beekeeper took to the Reddit forum, r/AITA to ask what people thought of them "wanting to keep my bees even though my new neighbor's son is highly allergic to them."

The user explained that they "have been keeping bees as a hobby for six years now" and have 4 hives in total in their suburban backyard.

All their hives are properly registered and are legal to keep in their town as of right now however, the problem is that their "new neighbors have asked me to get rid of my bees."

"They purchased the house and moved in over the winter and hadn't noticed my girls until this spring," they explained. "Apparently their son is highly allergic to bee stings. He has been hospitalized more than once and has to carry an epi pen.

"They asked nicely but seemed a little upset when I said I don't think I could do that."

The neighbors didn't push the Reddit user any more than that. However, they later "saw a rant on next door that I am sure was written by them."

And thenthe situation got worse as "some time after that some of the bee hating nextdoor people when to our town board and tried to get bee keeping outlawed in our town."

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Fortunately, their attempt didn't pass and the town board "mentioned in the minutes that current beekeepers would have to be grandfathered in if it did (Because of that I am even more wary of giving it up in case they do bring this legislation up again If I have active hives I can keep them)."

The Reddit user finishes their post by explaining that they are no longer on speaking terms with their neighbors.

The tale has caused quite the debate as some argued that the user was there first.

"It wasn't unreasonable of them to ask, nor were they the assholes until they started a rant on next door and tried to legislate against your hobby/pets. You were there first. You didn't move your hives, just winterized them. They were still in your yard. Plenty of people are allergic to bees, and they go about their activities with caution and an epi-pen," one person wrote.

"Also, it's not like bees will magically avoid their yard just because OP isn't keeping them. A wild hive will move in to pollinate that territory. So to my mind, it's a little silly to ask," said another.

While others questioned how they would feel if something happened to the child.

"I don't like this argument. Don't get me wrong I am a huge environmentalist and childfree. But. Are 4 hives more important than a child's life? You might say yes, the parents and the child (and I) would say no. But that's not the point here. The parents were within their rights to ask, OP is within their rights to decline. It's a sh***y situation with no clear right answer," one person wrote.

Do you think their neighbours were in the wrong to ask?