Derek Chauvin Juror Says Trial Was Like Watching Someone Die | 22 Words

One of the jurors from Derek Chauvin's murder trial has spoken about his experience of finding the former officer guilty of murder.

Here's the full story...

Now, the proceedings against Chauvin began on March 29th.

The prosecution started the trial by playing the horrifying video of the moment the accused, Derek Chauvin, dug his knee into George Floyd's neck as he cried out, "I can't breathe."

Special prosecutor Jerry Blackwell then told the jury in his opening statement:

"You can believe your eyes. That it's homicide, it's murder."

It was an undeniably difficult case for jury members to work on.

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Never-before-seen bodycam footage from the events of May 25th was also presented to the jury, giving fresh details of the minutes leading up to Floyd's arrest, as well as the moment he was confronted by the police officers.

Of course, the footage was utterly chilling to watch.

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Days on from that revelation, the prosecution called an outside expert witness to testify about Floyd's cause of death.

The evidence continued to stack up against Chauvin...

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And, clearly in panic mode, his defense continued to stress that Floyd had already put himself at risk by swallowing drugs and resisting officers trying to arrest him - factors that compounded his vulnerability to a diseased heart, raising sufficient doubt that Chauvin should be acquitted.

Chauvin eventually spoke for the first time on April 15th.

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He invoked his Fifth Amendment right to not risk making self-incriminating statements, laying to rest speculation over whether or not he would take the stand.

"Have you made a decision today whether you intend to testify or whether you intend to invoke your Fifth Amendment privilege?" Nelson asked.

"I will invoke my Fifth Amendment privilege today," Chauvin replied.

However, despite his defense's best efforts...

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Things didn't go in Chauvin's favor.

On April 20th, Derek Chauvin was found guilty of murdering George Floyd.

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The jury found the former police officer guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter.

Almost immediately, Twitter erupted into celebration over the result.

Shortly after his conviction, it was confirmed that Chauvin has been placed on suicide watch and was being observed under the highest security.

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Authorities were allegedly concerned about violence towards him from other prisoners, too.

But now, over a week on from his historic conviction, one of the jury members has spoken out.

Good Morning America

Brandon Mitchell, juror 52 in the trial, appeared on Good Morning America today to discuss what it was like to play such a substantial role in Chauvin's conviction.

Mitchell, a thirty-one-year-old basketball coach at North Community High School in Minneapolis, said he and the other eleven jurors didn't watch the news during the trial or deliberations, so they weren't aware of the racial climate or protests going on outside.

Good Morning America

"We were really just locked in on the case," Mitchell said in his first television interview, which aired this morning.

On the environment in the courtroom, he said:

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"I mean, those things are just so secondary because you're literally, throughout the trial, watching somebody die on a daily basis, so that stress alone is enough to take your mind away from whatever's going on outside of the four walls of the courtroom."

On the role the infamous video of Floyd's death played in the trial, Mitchell noted:

Good Morning America

"It's a historic video, unfortunately. It was probably the most important piece of evidence."

You can watch the full interview below.

Make sure to stay posted for further updates.