Olympic Boxer Disqualified for Attempting To Bite Ear | 22 Words

An Olympic boxer was recently disqualified after he attempted to bite down on an opponent's ear.

Youness Baalla, a Moroccan boxer, decided he was going to try and win the match by using a move out of Mike Tyson's playbook - the ear chomp. Baalla was points behind New Zealand's David Nyika when he went in towards his face and attempted to bite Nyika's ear.

We're not sure if he was trying to pay tribute to Tyson's notorious 1997 bite where he ripped a piece of Evander Holyfield's lobe right off, but whatever it was, it was clearly illegal.

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"Oooh, hello — now then," a commentator said as he watched Nyika snap his head away from Baalla, clearly shocked at what the twenty-two-year-old just attempted to do. The Kiwi tried his luck by complaining to the ref, but it didn't work in his favor as he just resumed the match.

"He almost lost the plot completely there. That could have been an act of absolute madness," the commentator added.

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Even though Baalla lost the match, he was later disqualified for his "intolerable action" after Olympic officials ruled he "very clearly intended to bite the ear/face of his opponent."

After the match, Nyika recalled the incident for 1 News, saying that Baalla didn't manage to get his ear, but did just manage to clip the side of his cheekbone.

"He didn't get a mouthful," the boxer stated. "Luckily he had his mouthguard in and I was a bit sweaty… But c'mon man this is the Olympics, get your s*** together."

On the other hand, Baalla also made a comment, but his statement was against the apparent haters in his direct messages. Posting to Instagram Stories, the Moroccan native said this: "To all the people coming from New Zealand … with all my respect to this country but you're not showing respect to yourselves," Baalla wrote on social media. "I will not answer any bad DM or comment from you and sorry I have big things waiting for me."

Later, like the gracious sportsman he is, Nyika defended his opponent telling fans to refrain from reaching out to him "if you have nothing nice to say."

"The heat of battle can bring the best AND the worst out of people. This is part of sport. I have nothing but respect for my opponent and can appreciate the frustration he must have felt."

Now, that's the sportsmanship we like to see.